CONN. MEN CHARGED WITH PASSING FAKE CASH

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CONN. MEN CHARGED WITH PASSING FAKE CASH

 user 2005-11-11 at 10:29:00 am Views: 43
  • #14576

    Conn. men charged with passing fake cash
    WEST NYACK — Two Connecticut men found with what police described as a trunk full of counterfeit bills in $1 and other denominations were ordered held on bail yesterday in the county jail following their arraignment on felony charges.
    Clarkstown police detectives found the bills in the trunk of a car driven by a man accused of trying to buy a half-dozen light bulbs with a phony $100 bill.
    “I’ve never seen a counterfeit $1 bill,” Sgt. Harry Baumann of the Clarkstown police said with a small laugh. “But they had a bunch of them.”
    Egra Hill, 41, and Addullah Badur Rahman, 35, both of Bridgeport, Conn., were arraigned late yesterday on charges of first-degree forgery of government-issued money, first-degree possession of a forged instrument and possession of forgery devices, all felonies, and criminal possession of a controlled substance, a misdemeanor. Justice Scott Ugell set their bail at $100,000 each.
    Secret Service agents, who investigate counterfeit money, were involved in the case and attended the court session.
    Sgt. Alan Armstrong said Hill and Rahman were arrested after officers were sent to The Home Depot at the Palisades Center about 6:20 p.m. Monday. A security guard alerted officers that someone had paid for a $7 six-pack of light bulbs with a $100 bill that appeared to be phony, and they were leaving in a red Chevrolet, police said.
    Officers stopped the car in the parking lot, police said, and took the driver and a passenger into custody.
    Armstrong said that when police opened the car’s trunk, they found ink cartridges, razors, several apparently altered insurance cards for various vehicles, computer paper and printed sheets of half-completed bills. In all, police confiscated apparently forged notes, including $100s, $50s, $20s, $10s, $5s and $1s. Face value of the bills was more than $10,000, including money the two men had in their possession when they were arrested, Baumann said.
    In addition to the copied bills, officers found two straws that contained what appeared to be cocaine residue, Armstrong said.
    Members of the Secret Service interviewed the two men during the day, Baumann said. There is a chance the men were not working alone, and a chance that some of the counterfeit bills had already been passed in the area, he said.
    Generally, forgers don’t bother with small denominations of bills; they usually copy bills with a face value of $20 or higher. The penalty for passing a forged bill is the same, no matter what the face value: up to 15 years in prison and a $15,000 fine for first-degree forgery.
    Most businesses have devices at their cash registers that can be used to authenticate bills. Baumann said a Home Depot clerk used one of the devices on the $100 bill before having security call Clarkstown police. The bills in the men’s possession did not have any watermarks on them and the paper did not have the correct weave, Baumann said