*NEWS*CURB WASTE & RAISE MONEY 4 EMPTIES

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*NEWS*CURB WASTE & RAISE MONEY 4 EMPTIES

 user 2006-01-10 at 10:19:00 am Views: 104
  • #13388

    Curb waste and raise money
    Schools and charities make cash recycling printer cartridges, cell phones
    Cutting down on landfill waste could help a local school or charity.
    The
    opportunity for schools and charities to raise cash seems to be growing
    along with rising sales of remanufactured inkjet and laser cartridges.
    Tired
    of the high price of ink and toner, owners of printers, faxes and copy
    machines are buying remanufactured cartridges in ever-larger numbers,
    industry experts say.
    Big Brothers and Sisters of Portage County
    started collecting inkjet and laser cartridges after seeing a decline
    in the donation of old cars, a key fund-raising effort that suffered
    after a 2005 change in tax law.
    Over the last few months, the
    recycling effort has raised $500, said Ron Kilchenman, associate
    director of the Ravenna agency. While not a large sum, he said it could
    help fund picnics and other extras for the 65 children in the program
    each year.
    He is asking more businesses to help in collecting the cartridges.
    Collect
    Inc. points out that U.S. individuals and businesses buy 400 million
    printer cartridges a year, and more than 80 percent will end up in
    landfills.
    Collect Inc. is a remanufacturer whose products are sold
    under the OfficeMax name and other brands, said President Michael J.
    Frothingham.
    With headquarters in Denver and a warehouse in suburban
    Cleveland’s Bedford, Collect Inc. took in about 600,000 used inkjet
    cartridges in 2005 and 200,000 laser cartridges. It also received about
    50,000 used cell phones.
    Collect Inc. operates the America’s Schools
    program, which teams schools, including several in the Akron area, with
    business groups.
    Schools can get up to $4 for an inkjet cartridge,
    $15 for laser and, on average, about $2 for a cell phone, Frothingham
    said. The price paid (if any) changes frequently based on market demand.
    The
    cartridges are inspected and refurbished at Collect Inc.’s plants in
    Nogales, Ariz., and Nogales, Mexico, he said. About one-third of the
    cell phones are reused and sold in Central or South America, while the
    rest are reused for parts or reclaimed for precious metals and shredded.
    Dozens
    of schools collect cartridges for Akron Recycling Center and make
    hundreds to thousands of dollars a year, said President Greg Loo.
    Parents prefer this fund-raiser to selling chocolate, magazines and fruit, he said.
    “The community can support the schools without it costing them anything,” Loo said.
    Akron
    Recycling, which has three full-time workers, picks up used cartridges
    in Northeast Ohio and neighboring states, while distant collectors can
    mail them free of charge to the South Main Street company. The
    cartridges are sold to remanufacturers.