*NEWS*USPS WANTS YOUR EMPTY CTGS

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*NEWS*USPS WANTS YOUR EMPTY CTGS

 user 2006-03-09 at 12:37:00 pm Views: 92
  • #14755

    Postal Service eyes e-waste recycling, seeks industry partner Old cell phones and printer cartridges could be dropped off at post offices
    (SORRY FOR THE LATE NOTICE)

    march, 2006   – The U.S. Postal Service (USPS) is considering a partnership with one or more
    companies to create a nationwide e-waste recycling program.
    In a request for proposals, the USPS said the program would allow consumers and small businesses to safely and conveniently dispose of obsolete equipment, which would initially include ink-jet and laser toner cartridges and cell phones. Other items such as computer hardware, peripheral devices and household electronics could be added later or collected periodically, the agency said in its request (download document). The main purpose of the initiative is to generate revenue for the USPS.
    The Postal Service said it would offer the service through its approximately 38,000 retail locations, 300,000 collection boxes and 290,000 letter carriers. Post office lobbies could be used to promote the program, as collection points for e-waste or for distribution of packaging and labels used for return shipments, the USPS said.
    Since 1999, a select number of the agency’s retail locations have participated in a trial program to recycle used ink-jet printer cartridges. Under that program, a user can purchase prepaid, preaddressed shipping envelopes at a participating post office, enclose the cartridge in the envelope and send it to a recycling facility. The envelope and the cost of the return shipment are paid for by the recycling partner, the USPS said. The plan is to replace the trial effort with a permanent e-recycling program.
    The USPS said it’s primarily looking for a partner that would agree to be charged for shipments initiated by a customer using the Postal Service’s returns service. The partner would also take possession of the returned goods or contract with another company to do so.
    The Postal Service said it would also look at other business models, including charging customers returning the goods for postage and/or other fees. However, the agency said this model might slow adoption of the program.
    Companies have until March 10 to respond to the USPS’s request for proposals.