*NEWS*CARTRIDGE WORLD SEES BOOMING SALES!

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*NEWS*CARTRIDGE WORLD SEES BOOMING SALES!

 user 2006-06-21 at 10:33:00 am Views: 42
  • #15669

    Remanufacturers of cartridges for printers see booming sales
    Firms save customers money on refills
    Jim
    Baumann, owner of Cartridge World in Cheektowaga, plans to open a
    second store,and maybe five more.In a 1,300-square-foot retail space,
    Jim Baumann’s business is bursting at the seams.
    His
    franchise – Cartridge World, a eco-friendly inkjet and laser cartridge
    remanufacturer, has been open for just one year. But response to
    business has been so positive that Baumann plans to open a second store
    within a year and sees five more on the horizon in the next three
    years.In the past decade, companies offering a recyling alternative to
    costly OEM (original equipment manufacturer) printer cartridges have
    been growing due to technological advances within the industry.Though
    largely under the radar, the dozen or so secondary market companies in
    Buffalo can save customers anywhere from 30 to 50 percent on cartridge
    costs, (not to mention helping the environment), while maintaining high
    printing quality, local companies said.”If we can save money and the
    environment at the same time, that’s a good thing,” Baumann said.Tom
    Eichenseer has seen customer demand at his company, Data Supply LLC,
    grow steadily over the past few years. “Business is better than ever,”
    said Eichenseer, whose 17-year-old Amherst business remanufactures and
    refills ink and toner cartridges.Despite a growing client base, many
    firms said that current demand for their services isn’t even near
    potential.”Until you’re exposed to the industry, you don’t even know it
    exists,” said Lisa Morganti, general manager at Quality Laser Services
    in Buffalo.That’s why Baumann, who has a background in corporate sales,
    hits the phones. Cold calling has helped build Cartridge World’s client
    base into the thousands, but Baumann’s found that letting his product
    speak for itself is the best way to attract customers.”The most
    response we’ve gotten is from word-of-mouth referral,” Baumann said.
    “They walk in the door and say, “I was told to come in.’ “That wasn’t
    always the case. Five years ago, Deniz Sarac, senior vice president and
    chief information officer at Prism Health Networks, was looking to cut
    printing costs. Through his own research, he learned of cartridge
    remanufacturers, but wasn’t convinced they could give him the quality
    he needed.”At that time, there were problems with reliability,” Sarac
    said.As the industry grew into new technology, that story began to
    change. These days, Sarac recycles two dozen laser toner and inkjet
    cartridges every month with Cartridge World. As a result, his company
    spends around $3,000 a month on cartridge replacement – a 40 percent
    cost reduction from the $5,000 it used to spend on new ones.”Those
    problems have gone away,” Sarac said of the issues that detered him
    from recycling cartridges five years ago.For the most part, the quality
    of aftermarket inks and toners is uncontested as companies have
    invested thousands of dollars into high-tech filling and testing
    equipment.Warnings coming from cartridge manufacturers about
    aftermarket quality has quieted. Last month, a study by Wilhelm Imaging
    Research concluded that the permanence of images with aftermarket ink
    is inferior to OEMs. But local companies stand by their work – most of
    them offering a 100 percent guarantee to any unsatisfied customer.”The
    perception that the product is not up to the standard of the OEM is a
    fallacy,” Morganti said
    .