DELL TAKES HIGH ROAD TO SCOTLAND

  • 161213_banner_futorag_902x177px
  • ink-direct-banner-902-x-177-v-1-2-big-banner-03-23-2017
  • cartridgewebsite-com-big-banner-02-09-07-2016
  • clover-depot-intl-us-ca-email-signature-05-10-2017-902x1772
  • mse-big-banner-new-03-17-2016-416716a-tonernews-web-banner-mse-212
  • 05 02 2016 429716a-cig-clearchoice-banner-902x177
  • Print
  • 2toner1-2
  • futor_902x177v7-tonernew
  • 4toner4
  • banner-01-26-17b
Share

DELL TAKES HIGH ROAD TO SCOTLAND

 user 2006-06-27 at 11:12:00 am Views: 43
  • #15868

    Dell takes high road to Scotland
    DELL,
    the US computer giant, is to “significantly ramp up” its operations in
    Glasgow and create jobs in Scotland rather than in Ireland, where it
    has its European manufacturing base.Since it opened last year the
    company’s Glasgow centre has handled UK-only sales and technical
    support calls from medium and large business clients, as well as the
    public sector.This is now to include European, Middle East and African
    (EMEA) business.It means that a planned steady build-up of staff of
    around 400 now to 850 by 2008 will easily be surpassed at the Glasgow
    base at the city’s former Imperial Tobacco factory, which has been
    supported by up to £7.5m of Regional Selective Assistance.Gartner
    analyst Malcolm Hancock said he expects Dell to fully tap into a
    “surplus” of highly skilled staff in Scotland who have become
    casualties of a once flourishing Silicon Glen.Dell is Ireland’s biggest
    IT employer, but Hancock claimed: “A readily available skilled
    workforce nearby is a big mover.” Ireland has to import around 80,000
    people a year to fill jobs. “So one can see where Dell is heading for
    future business needs.”A low rate of corporation tax in Ireland has
    proved a prime mover in the past for the likes of Dell and Microsoft to
    locate major operations there.However, the Irish Business and Employers
    Confederation’s third national survey claims that the cost of doing
    business in Ireland is now “spiralling out of control and threatening
    the viability of both indigenous and multinational companies.”According
    to the IBEC, quoted in Business Limerick, the Irish economy lost 7,700
    jobs nationally in the first four months of 2006.Dell director
    (software and peripherals) Michael Buck said: “A significant ramp-up is
    to occur in Glasgow which we are growing fast, especially when it comes
    to technical support expertise.”I can confirm that whilst the focus
    during the past year has been UK-only, from now on EMEA is to be
    included in our strategy. I cannot say yet by how much exactly, but
    further new jobs are to come in Glasgow on top of what we have
    previously announced.”Texas-based Dell is currently under pressure
    worldwide following a sharp drop in its first quarter profits this
    year, and it has seen its share price drop by 40% in the past year.Buck
    said that they were involved in a constant drive to cut costs and gain
    premium prices for their vast range of pcs, notebooks and servers plus
    a highly lucrative printer market, which Dell entered three years
    ago.Dell is keeping the launch of its new laser printers range – due
    out this week – firmly under wraps, so as not to give dominant player
    Hewlett-Packard any competitive advantage.Hancock said the firm was
    spending $180bn globally in this sector, of which one third is European
    based. The UK accounts for a fifth of the European figure of $60bn.