XEROX’s DR. BADESHA EARNS 150th PATENT

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XEROX’s DR. BADESHA EARNS 150th PATENT

 user 2007-04-30 at 10:52:00 am Views: 45
  • #18085

    Xerox’s Santokh Badesha Earns 150th Patent
    Xerox
    Corporation’s Santokh S. Badesha was awarded his 150th U.S. patent
    today, a feat that ranks him among the nation’s most inventive minds
    and a milestone achieved by only one other inventor in Xerox’s history.

    Badesha’s
    150th U.S. patent – No. 7,198,875 — is titled “Amino-functional
    siloxane copolymer release agents for fuser members.” It covers the
    fuser oil material composition and is used for fusing color images to
    paper in xerographic products. The technology is being used in the
    iGen3(R) Digital Production Press.At Xerox, where inventors have
    generated more than 17,800 U.S. patents and more than 50,000 worldwide,
    only physicist Robert Gundlach, who retired in 1995 with 155 Xerox
    patents, has earned more than Badesha, a Xerox Fellow and manager,
    research open innovation.At the same time, Clarkson University has
    announced that Badesha will receive an honorary Doctor of Science
    degree at its 2007 commencement May 13, 2007. The degree recognizes
    Badesha for encouraging innovation in academia through partnerships
    with industry.”Either event would be a fantastic achievement, so to
    have both happening simultaneously is really quite extraordinary,” said
    Sophie Vandebroek, Xerox chief technology officer and president of the
    Xerox Innovation Group. “Santokh has a gift for identifying core issues
    and working collaboratively to solve them. He is a respected leader and
    his contributions to Xerox are countless.”Badesha’s early inventions
    helped improve photoreceptors, the surface that carries the invisible
    image of a document after it’s been exposed to light. Most of his other
    inventions have improved the next step in the process – making the
    invisible image on the photoreceptor visible on paper.Badesha has
    approximately 35 other patent applications that are currently being
    examined by the U.S. Patent Office, and he plans to file 10 more by the
    end of the year.Badesha’s commitment to collaboration helped shaped the
    research direction at Clarkson University’s Center for Advanced
    Materials Processing (CAMP), where he has served on the board of
    directors since 1988. He currently is overseeing a joint research
    effort between Xerox, Clarkson and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
    (RPI) aimed at lowering the energy consumption of machines and other
    devices. The research projects are part of a $16.6 million state
    funding initiative aimed at developing new technology and supporting
    research collaborations between universities and industry.”Dr.
    Badesha’s research emphasizes a greater awareness of our environment,
    encouraging both energy efficiency and recycling, making him a true
    role model for students in Clarkson’s flagship programs in
    environmental and renewable energy research,” said Clarkson University
    President Tony Collins. “He has worked to build bridges between
    Clarkson University and industry, serving as a valuable colleague for
    Clarkson’s Center for Advanced Materials Processing, and partnering
    with us to shape its research direction.”