HP & KODAK SPAR OVER PRINTER & INK CLAIMS

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HP & KODAK SPAR OVER PRINTER & INK CLAIMS

 user 2007-05-31 at 12:13:00 pm Views: 63
  • #18169

    HP And Kodak Spar Over Printer And Ink Claims
    When
    Kodak launched its inkjet printers recently, it included a report from
    Quality Logic that talked about how its models were more cost efficient
    at printing photos than HP’s inkjets. That started off a war of words.
    Here’s HP’s response and Kodak’s rebuttal below:As the recognized,
    long-term leader in imaging and printing systems, HP is confident that
    our technology innovations and products will continue to thrive in the
    marketplace and compare very favorably to this new inkjet entrant’s
    offerings. For more than 20 years, HP has consistently reduced the
    total cost of printing, while at the same time raising the bar of the
    printing experience.Bottom line:  Kodak’s products don’t save customers
    50% on everything they print and HP’s products offer more features and
    better technology at the same price points.
    ·         According to
    analysis of data provided by Lyra Research Inc., the average home
    customer prints about 70 pages per month with a ratio of 2:1 of black
    documents to color, and about 6 photos per month.
    ·         HP
    also compared the yields of our own and Kodak’s products using ISO
    testing methods for plain paper and HP’s own photo-yield test.
    ·        
    HP already offers lower CPP than Kodak.  For example, our new Officejet
    Pro L7580 ($299) has a black CPP of 1.4 cents versus Kodak’s 2.9 cents
    at the same price point.
    ·         When comparing the HP Photosmart
    C5180 and C6180 to the comparable Kodak models (the 5300 and 5500),
    Kodak’s total cost of ownership was only approx. 70 cents per month
    less than HP.  This is a far cry from Kodak’s “50% less” assertion.
    While
    we have not fully analyzed all the claims in Kodak’s yield report, our
    initial review found that it’s not necessarily an apples-to-apples
    comparison with HP’s offerings.
    ·         Kodak’s and QualityLogic’s
    testing confirm that using the ISO 24711 test method with ISO 24712
    test documents, HP’s Photosmart C5180 provides lower cost-per-page
    printing black text (2.6 cents for HP Vs. 2.9 cents for Kodak).  This
    likely explains why, in their published results, Kodak switched to
    ISO’s 19752 mono test suite, using dissimilar driver settings for HP,
    in order to get a mono cost-per-page result where Kodak has an
    advantage.
    ·         QualityLogic’s test did not include all
    available HP supplies. For example, HP’s Photosmart C4180 offers a
    larger black supply (HP 95) than what was included in the test, which
    would have resulted in lower black cost-per-page for HP.  What’s more,
    HP offers many different value pack options that further reduce HP’s
    cost-of-printing.
    ·         QualityLogic’s mono test did not compare
    similar print modes between Kodak and HP.  For Kodak’s product,
    QualityLogic set the printer for black and white printing through the
    driver, as is called for in the ISO 24711 test method.  For HP,
    QualityLogic used the default setting for plain paper, even though a
    grayscale setting was available, violating the ISO 24711 standard.
    ·        
    For driver settings, they used the Kodak auto detect mode (defined as
    normal quality), while all other printers they forced into best
    quality. Note that for the HP C5180 they used Premium Plus Photo paper
    in best mode. The recommended paper for this printer is Advanced Photo
    Paper, and using this paper with Auto Sense defaults to normal quality.
    This means the yields are lower than what the typical customer would
    experience.

    HP understands there are different types of
    customers with different printing needs. After listening to our
    customers and realizing that one cartridge does not fit all, HP has
    reinvented and expanded our global supplies portfolio to offer new
    product options, while also making the process of choosing and buying
    printing supplies simpler than ever.
    ·         For those customers
    who want a lower purchase price, HP already offers color ink cartridges
    starting at $9.99 (HP 02) and black ink cartridges starting at $14.99
    (HP 60). As part of our new innovative ink supplies strategy, HP’s
    “standard” cartridges – packaged in blue – are designed for customers
    who print a limited number of pages on a weekly or monthly basis.
    ·        
    For those who are more concerned with cost savings and lower cost per
    page, HP offers a variety of “value” options packaged in green,
    including twin and combo packs – and for photo printing, Photo Value
    Packs. In fact, the new HP Officejet Pro L7500 All-in-One, based on
    HP’s exclusive Scalable Printing Technology, offers
    professional-quality prints as low as 1.5 cents per page for black and
    white and 7.7 cents per page for color.
    ·         HP’s “specialty”
    inkjet print cartridges, packaged in red, offer additional performance
    advantages over HP’s standard formulations – ideal for customers who
    primarily print photographs and demand exceptional quality.
    HP will
    continue investing heavily in new ideas and new products, as we believe
    our customers will continue to recognize the unique value we bring to
    meet their printing needs.
    Here’s the response from Kodak:  
    HP
    recently distributed a series of statements regarding the independent
    ink yield and cost-per-page results that QualityLogic and Kodak
    presented earlier this month.HP’s strategy appears to be to draw
    attention away from the results by questioning the validity of some of
    the testing methods used. To ensure credible and transparent testing
    and results, Kodak sought an independent testing facility with managers
    that sit on the ISO Standards Committee.Kodak’s strategy is to offer
    something different, something consumers have been asking for — less
    expensive home inkjet printing. The QualityLogic ink yield test and
    Kodak cost-of-printing analysis were conducted to prove, in
    black-and-white, that Kodak’s business model delivers.
     
    Following are QualityLogic / Kodak’s responses to the HP statements about the cost-per-page analysis and results.
    1)
    HP states, “Kodak’s and Quality Logic’s testing confirm that using the
    ISO 24711 test method with ISO 24712 test documents, HP’s Photosmart
    C5180 provides lower cost-per-page printing black text (2.6 cents for
    HP versus 2.9 cents for Kodak). This likely explains why, in their
    published results, Kodak switched to ISO’s 19752 mono test suite, using
    dissimilar driver settings for HP (see point 3 below), in order to get
    a mono cost-per-page result where Kodak has an advantage.”
     
    Kodak and QualityLogic respond:
    Actually,
    the ISO standard presents both the 24712 and 19752 test suites for
    determining black-and-white ink yields. To provide the greatest amount
    of transparency and accuracy, Kodak and QualityLogic reported both sets
    of ink yields and cost-per-page findings.As history: Annex E was added
    to ISO 24711 standard to provide the option to use the monochrome test
    page defined in ISO 19752 to, “test the yield of color inkjet and color
    laser printers in situations where monochrome text is printed
    predominantly or comparisons need to be made between color and
    monochrome printers. This is not meant to take the place of testing
    black yield using ISO/IEC 24712, but to be in addition to testing with
    ISO/IEC 24712.”
    In accordance with ISO, black ink yield was tested
    with 24712 and 19752. It is worth noting that ISO 24712 is a suite of
    pages that all include some color, so if users really want to compare
    yields using a black text document, ISO 19752 seems better suited for
    that purpose. That is what QualityLogic did, and the results showed
    that Kodak provides the lowest cost-per-page.

    It is beneficial for consumers to be able to compare page yields across technologies.
    2)
    HP states, “Quality Logic’s test did not include all available HP
    supplies. For example, HP’s Photosmart C4180 offers a larger black
    supply (HP 95) than what was included in the test, which would have
    resulted in lower black cost-per-page for HP. What’s more, HP offers
    many different value pack options that further reduce HP’s
    cost-of-printing.”

    Kodak and QualityLogic respond: 
    Kodak
    chose to test the cartridges that ship with each printer because these
    are the cartridges that consumers are most likely to purchase.
    Therefore, the testing was based on individually purchased cartridges.
    It is also the most practical way to provide an apples-to-apples
    comparison.Like HP, Kodak offers a discounted combo cartridge pack,
    delivering an even lower cost-of-ink and lower cost-per-page to
    consumers. While this would have provided even better cost-per-page
    results for Kodak, it would not have supported apples-to-apples
    comparative testing.
     
    Kodak responds:
    HP offers cartridge
    twin packs for the 93 and 98 cartridges used in the HP Photosmart
    C4180. The standard cartridges cost $19.99 each. Twin packs cost $35.99
    for two 93 or two 98 cartridges. Effectively, HP gives consumers a 10%
    discount per cartridge with their twin packs.According to Kodak’s
    analysis, over a three-year period of printing an average number of
    pages and using standard ink cartridges (see Kodak Cost-of-Printing
    Analysis), consumers can save approximately $300 on ink if they use a
    Kodak printer instead of the HP C4180. If consumers were to use HP
    twin-cartridge packs over the same three-year period with the HP C4180,
    they would still pay $270 more than Kodak users — assuming the Kodak
    customers hadn’t purchased Kodak’s combo-packs, which would save them
    even more on cost-per-page.3) HP states, “Quality Logic’s mono test did
    not compare similar print modes between Kodak and HP. For Kodak’s
    product, Quality Logic set the printer for black and white printing
    through the driver, as is called for in the ISO 24711 test method. For
    HP Quality Logic used the default setting for plain paper, even though
    a grayscale setting was available, violating the ISO 24711 standard.
    The likely result of this was to decrease the amount of color ink used
    from the Kodak product during black printing and increase the amount of
    color use from HP.”

    QualityLogic responds:
    Annex E of ISO
    24711 requires that if a “black only” or “text only” mode exists in the
    driver, it be enabled. Two printers in the test offered a “black only”
    or “text only” mode: the Kodak EasyShare 5300 and the Epson Stylus
    CX6000. Grayscale does not fit the ISO definition. Therefore
    QualityLogic used the default driver setting on the HP C5180.4) HP
    states, “Quality Logic and Kodak used HP’s Premium Plus photo media for
    their yield test and resulting photo cost-of-printing, while for their
    own products Kodak compared their Premium Photo Paper. HP’s paper that
    is most comparable to Kodak’s Premium Photo Paper is our Advanced Photo
    Paper, which, if used in the test, would have resulted in lower photo
    cost-of-printing for HP.”

    Kodak and QualityLogic respond: 
    As
    clearly reported in QualityLogic’s ISO test report, QualityLogic used
    Kodak’s Ultra Premium Photo Paper (glossy) in the photo test. This is
    the highest-grade photo paper available from Kodak and is directly
    comparable to the highest-grade photo papers from other manufacturers.
    5)
    HP states, “Kodak’s claims compare their own cost-of-printing to what
    they call the “industry average.” The “industry average”
    cost-of-printing is largely meaningless to customers because it
    represents no actual product that they would experience. These numbers
    are based on an average of many different products.”
     
    Kodak responds:
    Kodak
    compared the cost-of-ink on the Kodak printer to the individual tested
    printers, as well as to an average of all tested printers. The
    objective was to provide consumers with as much information as possible
    to ensure a more informed purchasing decision.Just because the
    cost-per-page performance for three of the four HP printers tested was
    not as good as the average does not mean the comparison is bad for
    consumers to understand.
    6) HP states, “Quality Logic and Kodak used
    several products in their test (Canon MP 160 – $89, HP PS C3180 – $99
    & Lexmark X3470 – $99), which are priced considerably lower than
    Kodak’s hardware. Had Kodak and Quality Logic used only products at the
    same prices as Kodak’s ($149, $199 and $299), it would have lowered the
    industry average cost-of-printing for non-Kodak products.”
     
    Kodak responds:
    The
    printers tested were selected because they are some of the most popular
    models available on the market from each manufacturer. Therefore, the
    cost-per-page testing of these models is most relevant to
    consumers.Kodak and QualityLogic have sought to offer transparency in
    methodology and testing to produce credible cost-per-page results.