*NEWS*ISO STANDARTS TO CHANGE CONSUMABLES

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*NEWS*ISO STANDARTS TO CHANGE CONSUMABLES

 user 2007-07-17 at 11:40:00 am Views: 54
  • #18389

    Printouts leads to profits
    New standards in ISO test may change the way printing consumables are seen         
    One
    of the biggest margin generators for anyone selling printers is
    consumables. Like most hardware, the devices themselves offer little in
    the way of profit, but they can be bottomless pits for ink and toner
    over their lifetimes, and that means dollars in the reseller’s
    pocket.The trouble from the consumer’s point of view is that they have
    no idea how many printouts to expect from any given printer before it’s
    time to bite the bullet and cough up for fresh ink or toner, meaning
    all too many emergency trips to the store.If the printer is a model
    that’s been around for a while, the reseller may have an notion of how
    long the ink will last, based on experience, and can offer advice. But
    for new printers, actual page count per cartridge is anyone’s guess.
    Every manufacturer measures number of pages per cartridge in the most
    advantageous way for its products.There is hope. The International
    Organization for Standardization (ISO) has approved the ISO/IEC
    24711:2006 standard defining the method for the determination of ink
    cartridge yield for colour inkjet printers and multi-function devices
    that contain printer components (ISO/IEC 19798, published at the end of
    2006, and 19752, published in 2004, respectively deal with colour and
    monochrome toner).This standard provides a way to consistently
    determine yield across products, instead of relying on the standard
    crock of per cent coverage that’s been foisted on us for so many years.
    With no consistent definition of what that percentage actually
    represented (all one colour, all text, images, whatever), it has been
    virtually impossible to figure out which printers were most economical
    to run, or what to expect in real world usage.Members of the
    International Committee for Information Technology Standards, including
    most market leading printer vendors such as Canon, Dell, Epson, HP,
    Kodak, Lexmark, Okidata and Xerox, have announced their support for the
    new standards, which specify the conditions and test suite used to
    determine cartridge yield.Each test is performed in the printer’s
    default mode (no more cheating by using draft mode for tests, then
    defaulting to standard mode out of the box), and consists of exhausting
    a minimum of nine cartridges by continuously printing a defined set of
    PDF documents on 8.5 x 11 inch or A4 paper, using at least three
    printers to account for production anomalies. Even the ambient
    temperature is controlled (23 celsius, +/- 2 degrees), since that, too,
    can affect results.While this still doesn’t reflect how people print in
    the real world (a few pages at a time, perhaps with days between print
    jobs), it’s at least consistent across manufacturers so consumers and
    resellers can make a more realistic comparison of printing systems. And
    the emphasis is on systems – a printer and cartridge combination, not
    the just particular type of cartridge or a specific printer model. The
    same cartridge may perform differently in different printer models.The
    hope is that the ISO-rated yield will ultimately be shown on each
    cartridge’s packaging, giving consumers who actually read labels a clue
    how often they’ll be shopping for ink, and giving resellers an
    opportunity to build loyalty by explaining the ratings so those
    emergency ink runs are no longer necessary.