*NEWS*S C.C…..APOLOGIZE & DROPS LAWSUIT

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*NEWS*S C.C…..APOLOGIZE & DROPS LAWSUIT

 user 2008-01-29 at 12:46:00 pm Views: 58
  • #19233

    Chip patent suit dropped, with apology
    A Tierra Verde inventor will share in sales profits.
    When
    a powerful competitor accused him of selling counterfeit
    printer-cartridge chips in 2004, Steven Miller flatly denied it. He
    blamed the predicament on false testimony by ex-employees.Turns out the
    Tierra Verde inventor was on to something.Three-plus years after Miller
    was sued for patent infringement, the case has been dropped. Ed Swartz,
    CEO of Static Control Components of Sanford, N.C., issued a public
    apology. “If we had known the whole story, then this dispute would have
    settled a long time ago,” he said in a news release. “Mr. Miller is a
    hard-working, bright young man, and I look forward to working with him.”

    Vindication
    isn’t the only reward for Miller, a 46-year-old auto repair shop owner
    who also designs parts for private-label ink and toner cartridges. A
    cross-licensing agreement he reached with Static Control – which bills
    itself as the world’s largest distributor of toner-cartridge components
    - will guard against future patent litigation between the two parties.
    It also could earn Miller millions of dollars in royalties, he said in
    an interview Monday.”We’re happy with the settlement,” Static Control
    general counsel Skip London said Monday. “We’ve reached a resolution
    that we think is good for our company and good for Steve’s
    company.”Originally filed in North Carolina, Static Control’s lawsuit
    was chock full of oddities. It accused Miller and business associate
    Robert Rauber of buying Static’s chips, hiring a Russian engineer to
    extract the software code, manufacturing counterfeit copies, and
    distributing them through a firm fronted by David P. Abraham, a
    homeless ex-convict from St. Petersburg.There was one kernel of truth
    to the allegations, Miller said: Abraham, a former employee of his
    Pinellas Park auto repair shop, was indeed homeless and in trouble with
    the law. So Miller – who said he himself lived in a car as a teen -
    offered Abraham the chance to turn his life around by becoming a
    distributor of Miller’s patented printer-cartridge technologies. “He’s
    gone from being a menace to society to being a businessperson and a
    homeowner,” Miller said.