LTO TAPES …. OVER 100 MILLION SOLD

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LTO TAPES …. OVER 100 MILLION SOLD

 user 2008-09-09 at 11:52:48 am Views: 70
  • #20413
    http://www.itjungle.com/tfh/tfh090808-story10.html
    LTO Tapes: Over 100 Million Served
    The
    Linear Tape Open (LTO) form factor for tape drives just keeps hitting
    higher and higher numbers. Last week, the three big players behind
    LTO–IBM, Hewlett-Packard, and Quantum–said that since the first LTO
    products were announced at the turn of the millennium, a large number
    of tape decks and a huge number of tape cartridges have been sold.

    How
    many? As of last week, some 2.5 million LTO drives have shipped, with a
    million of those units shipping since the third quarter of 2006. The
    LTO format was launched in 1998, and products started coming to market
    in the fall of 2000 from IBM, HP, and Seagate Technology, which spun
    out its LTO business as Certance before it was acquired in October 2004
    by Quantum. The industry is currently on its fourth generation of
    technology, LTO-4, and although the consortium has had to back off a
    bit on capacity and performance roadmaps for the LTO format, they have
    done a pretty good job given the limits of tape technology in keeping
    the technology relevant as data storage just explodes all around us.
    The LTO-4 format provides 1.6 TB cartridges that have 240 MB/sec data
    transfer rates with compression turned on, which is a lot of
    improvement compared to LTO-1 drives and tapes, which had a compressed
    capacity of 200 GB and a data transfer rate of 40 MB/sec. On the
    current roadmap, LTO-5 is expected to deliver 3.2 TB tapes and drives
    that can push 360 MB/sec (again, with compression), and LTO-6 will
    sport 6.4 TB tapes and a data rate of 540 MB/sec. That’s a factor of 32
    improvement in data capacity and factor of 13.5 improvement in data
    transfer rates. It’s pretty obvious which one is the more difficult
    aspect of tape technology to push.

    Anyway, the LTO Consortium
    also wanted to let everyone know that over 100 million LTO cartridges
    have shipped to date, and they represent an aggregate compressed
    capacity of 40 exabytes of storage across all of those LTO generations.
    Because we always do this statistic in the IT racket to humanize the
    numbers, that is 40 trillion books’ worth of data, or about 1 million
    copies of the Library of Congress. Of course, we all know in IT that a
    lot of data out there eating up space in not in textual format, but all
    kinds of dense files like digital photos, streaming media, zillions of
    copies of useless junk, and such.