HP NOW SELL 3 PRINTERS EVERY SECOND

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HP NOW SELL 3 PRINTERS EVERY SECOND

 user 2009-07-10 at 12:29:49 pm Views: 47
  • #22346

    http://www.siliconbeat.com/2009/06/22/hps-mark-hurd-speaking-at-stanford/
    HP’s Mark Hurd speaking at Stanford
    Hewlett-Packard CEO Mark Hurd gave a short talk at Stanford this morning, and offered a few interesting comments on running the world’s biggest technology company
    First, on the sheer size of HP: The company’s annual sales grew from $79 billion in 2004 to $118 billion last year. The recent EDS acquisition gave HP nearly 320,000 employees. Hurd said HP’s supply chain now delivers three printers every second, two PCs a second and nearly one server every ten seconds.Second, on the ethical challenges that face a global company which does 70 percent of its business outside the United States: Hurd said HP’s chief ethics officer and legal staff are constantly reviewing operations, but added, “There are lots of opportunities for things to not be exactly as we like it to be. We know something is not right this second, but we just don’t know exactly what it is.”

    Hurd went on to say that HP has to be extra vigilant as it does so much business in emerging markets like Russia. “Nothing against Russia. But those emerging markets also have emerging cultures in the way they do business. We have people who grew up in cultures where they don’t do business the way we at HP like to do business.”Third, on the personal demands of his job: Hurd, who reportedly collected about $42 million in salary, bonuses and compensation last year, said he spends nearly two-thirds of his time traveling and meeting with customers and managers around the world. When asked how that affects his family life — Hurd is married and has two children — he responded: “I don’t think you take these jobs if you’re not going to do them. I think you have to be willing to deal with the repercussions or you don’t sign on.”He went on: “The minute you try to re-architect something to fit your personal life, when you have a company like ours, it won’t work. It’s non-sustainable.”Hurd also outlined some of HP’s strategic vision for IT, which calls for building hardware around open, non-proprietary standards, and then adding value (and profit) by selling software and services on top of that.Different segments of the hardware market are converging, he added, predicting that in five years, “you will not be able to tell a server from a storage device, a storage device from a networking device.”