THE GOOD LIFE, EX-XEROX CEO BUYS NEW $ 7.4M. APARTMENT

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THE GOOD LIFE, EX-XEROX CEO BUYS NEW $ 7.4M. APARTMENT

 user 2009-11-24 at 10:46:04 am Views: 42
  • #23003

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/15/realestate/15deal3.html
    EX-XEROX CEO BUYS NEW $ 7.4M.
    APARTMENT IN NEW-YORK

    They Have to Live Somewhere
    PERHAPS too
    much has been said about those tiresome kings of finance, macho bankers
    and hedge fund executives who have swooped in and picked up some of New
    York’s most valuable real estate in good times — and less good times.But
    they aren’t the only business people stepping up to find a new home,
    despite the current uncertain market. Property records filed this month
    show that Anne M. Mulcahy, the chairwoman and until recently chief
    executive of Xerox, closed on a $7.4 million three-bedroom apartment on
    the 13th floor in the Superior Ink condominium on West Street and West
    12th Street.

    Ms. Mulcahy and her husband, Joseph, own a large
    house on the beach in Fairfield, Conn.They also owned a three-bedroom
    condo in the Grand Beekman, on East 51st Street, but sold that last year
    when they were already in contract to buy at Superior Ink.

    Ms.
    Mulcahy’s closing happened a day after Lisa Carnoy, the global head of
    equity capital markets at Bank of America Merrill Lynch, closed on a
    six-bedroom 4,300-square-foot apartment at the Harrison, a new condo
    development designed by Robert A. M. Stern at 205 West 76th Street, for
    $9.74 million.

    Property records show that Ms. Carnoy and her
    husband, David, an editor at cnet.com, went into contract in January
    2007, long before the Bank of America purchased Merrill Lynch last year
    and paid $3.6 billion in disputed bonuses to key Merrill executives.