HP START PILOT PROGRAM TO COLLECT EMPTIES IN CANADA(VIDEO)

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HP START PILOT PROGRAM TO COLLECT EMPTIES IN CANADA(VIDEO)

 user 2010-04-26 at 11:22:50 am Views: 58
  • #23695
    http://www.thedailygreen.com/living-green/blogs/cars-transportation/recycle-printer-cartridges-460410
    HP START PILOT PROGRAM TO COLLECT EMPTIES
    IN CANADA

    Check out HP and the Lavergne
    Group’s advanced processing technology, which is saving money and
    resource use.


    CLICK HERE TO SEE
    LIVE VIDEO
    MUST SEE !!!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PlAISgY1bAM
    CLICK HERE TO SEE LIVE VIDEO
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XxG0iP8pDkI&feature=related

    MONTREAL — Recycling isn’t usually much fun to watch. Those
    blue bins aren’t too animated. And don’t we all suspect that as soon as
    the truck turns the corner it all gets thrown in the landfill anyway?
    That has actually happened in some places when the value of recycled
    material went into the toilet.

    In some cases, we’re going
    backwards in recycling. Take just the case of plastic water bottles. We
    produce 29 billion of them a year, and only 30 percent get recycled,
    which means an escalating amount of waste (expressed in millions of
    tons).

    But plastic water bottles are eminently recyclable, and
    earlier this week, in Montreal, I saw them put to good use.
    Hewlett-Packard, which makes the printer cartridges we all pay dearly
    for, isn’t content to let them go to landfills. These days, they’re
    being dismantled instead of shredded — a much cleaner process.

    The
    company started recycling cartridges in 1991 (taking back more than 300
    million from inkjet and laser printers), and is getting much better at
    figuring out how to reuse the plastic. Today, a pilot project in a
    French-Canadian factory is no longer shredding the cartridges (a process
    that leaves a contaminated mix of plastic, metal and paper), it’s
    dismantling them for 50 percent greater yields in recovered plastic.
    Here’s how it works, according to HP’s Dean Miller:You can send your
    cartridges back to their maker in a number of ways (there are programs
    in 50 countries) and the options include mailing them back in pre-paid
    envelopes and returning them for credit to Staples stores. Either way,
    they end up at industrial facilities like the one I visited in Montreal.

    But
    they don’t get crushed. In 2005, after five years of work, HP developed
    a closed-loop system for recycling printer cartridges that, at the
    Lavergne Group facility I visited alone, handles a million pounds of
    plastic every month. Closed loop means the plastic lives again as new
    cartridges. HP has made more than 500 million printer-ready cartridges
    through the closed-loop process since 2005.

    The closed-loop
    process is like something out of the movie Brazil — a combination of
    retro mechanical and high tech. Dismantling (especially in this pilot
    scale) is much slower than crushing cartridges, of course. The
    dismantler handles 15 cartridge a minute, and the shredder thousands per
    hour. But the result is much cleaner: The robot arms scrape off the
    label, lop off the plastic lid, remove the electronic guts and the foam
    pad, then toss the remaining plastic bucket into a hopper.

    Once
    shredded, the cartridge material is mixed with 75 to 80 percent plastic
    bottle waste and then (they wouldn’t let us see this part) combined with
    special chemical additives to make it strong and pliable — in effect,
    basically the same as virgin plastic again.Until recently, the process
    handled only easy-to-recycle PET plastic, but last year polypropylene
    (PP) was added and almost two million cartridges with PP have been
    processed.After having received some flak on the issue, HP has also
    considerably reduced the packaging going into its ink cartridges.
    There’s no U.S. law mandating that kind of waste reduction, but
    so-called Green Dot laws in Europe and Asia give impetus to that kind of
    reform. Green Dot makes manufacturers responsible for their packaging,
    which in effect gives them huge motivation to reduce the amount they
    include with products. Buy toothpaste in the U.S. and it comes in the
    box; buy the identical brand in Europe and it stands on its cap.

    Strong
    corporate lobbies discourage the European approach here, but on March
    25 Maine became the first state in the U.S. to enact an extended
    producer responsibility (EPR) law. And some 19 states have rules
    requiring takeback of electronic equipment. A national law would tie all
    of this together, and it will be a brave legislator who shepherds a
    bill through to passage.

    As a car writer, I’m always looking for
    an auto angle, and I found it in a Lavergne Group office displaying a
    number of auto parts, including a taillight assembly. They’re all made
    from plastic recycled in the plant. Lavergne has a contract with Ford to
    provide plastic for Econoline van front ends, and because of the strong
    European end-of-life vehicle laws it’s looking at setting up a branch
    to serve carmakers in Germany.Knowing about all this should stay your
    hand when hit by the impulse to throw away that spent printer cartridge.
    Not only is there money in it (get thee to the nearest Staples story)
    but properly recycled it will again dispense ink.