STAPLES STANDS BY PHOTO PAPER

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STAPLES STANDS BY PHOTO PAPER

 user 2005-05-12 at 11:10:00 am Views: 71
  • #9729

    Staples stands by photo paper
     May 05
    Staples’ top-of-the-line photo paper has been
    criticised as the battle over market share in paper,
    ink and chemicals for digital printing becomes
    increasingly aggressive.
    Wilhelm Imaging Research, a testing lab in
    Grinnell, Iowa, which was recently hired by Hewlett-Packard, denounced
    Staples-branded paper, claiming that photos printed on it fade rapidly from
    exposure to ozone pollution.
    Staples has refuted the claims. A
    spokesperson for the company told OPI: “Staples’ brand photo papers have been
    tested extensively by the Rochester Institute of Technology and have proven to
    offer excellent quality in the areas most important to customers – image quality
    and dry time. They also provide flexibility to print on multiple manufacturers’
    printers and are optimised for multiple
    ink
    brands.”
    With 61 per cent of photo prints now made at home, paper
    suppliers such as Staples and Eastman Kodak are facing stiff competition from
    printer makers eager to market their own lines of speciality photo paper.

    Wal-Mart, meanwhile, is attempting to gain market share by luring its
    customers to print digital pictures in store.
    Analysts also expect the
    market landscape to be pitted with an increasing number of acquisitions of
    online photo start-ups. “The pie isn’t necessarily going to get any bigger,”
    Frank Baillargeon, an industry consultant in Eagle, Idaho, told Associated
    Press, “but it’s going to be sliced up in many different ways.”