How's Uk's MI5 Foiled The Airplane Toner Bomb Attack In 2010

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How's Uk's MI5 Foiled The Airplane Toner Bomb Attack In 2010

 news 2015-03-02 at 2:39:43 pm Views: 262
  • #42075

    How's Uk's MI5 Foiled The Airplane Toner Bomb Attack In 2010
    British authorities foiled ink cartridge plot to bring down two planes 'after tip-off obtained from torture'

    Information obtained using torture was used to help foil an al-Qaeda plot to bring down two planes, it has been claimed.

    British authorities intercepted a bomb at East Midlands Airport after being 'tipped off' by Saudi Arabian security forces, reportedly following the interrogation by torture of an al-Qaeda operative.

    The claim comes as former MI5 head Sir John Sawers said torture does produce 'useful information' and can be 'effective in the short term.'

    A major security alert was launched after plastic explosives concealed inside inkjet printer cartridges were discovered on two cargo planes travelling from Yemen to the US in October 2010. 

    It is believed the bombs were designed to go off mid-air and bring the huge planes down over the US.

    After what was described as a 'tip-off' from Saudi Arabian security forces, the planes were stopped at East Midlands Airport in Leicestershire and the United Arab Emirates and the bombs uncovered.

    A group called Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) later took responsibility for the plot.

    Now it has been claimed the discovery at East Midlands Airport was only possible because British officials in Saudi Arabia were in communication with a team believed to have been using torture on a member of terror group al-Qaeda.

    'The people in London went back on the phone two or three times to where the interrogation was taking place in Riyadh to find out specifically where the bomb was hidden. There were two Britons there, in immediate communication with where the interrogation was taking place, and as soon as it happened, they were in touch with the UK. It was all done in real time,' an intelligence source told Jamie Merrill, James Hanning, Mark Leftly and Nick Clark at The Independent On Sunday.

    A source close to the operation said there was 'no way' that the information which led to the plot being exposed 'wasn’t procured under duress', but that the British officials would have ensured they were not present.  

    He added: 'Of course we use intelligence from torture. We take it from wherever we can get it, but we are never, ever going to say "we don’t want that". Or ask too many questions about where it has come from. It is the difference between intelligence and evidence.'

    Last month, following the death of King Abdullah, Prime Minister David Cameron defended Britain's ties with Saudi Arabia – despite the country’s record on human rights.

    He also said that a piece of counter-terrorism intelligence supplied by the Arab state had 'saved potentially hundreds of lives' in the UK, which aides have confirmed was a reference to the bomb plot.

    He added: 'Now, you can be Prime Minister and say exactly what you think about every regime in the world and make great headlines, and give great speeches.

    'But I think my first job is to try and keep this country safe from terrorism and if that means you have to build strong relationships sometimes with regimes you don't always agree with, that I think is part of the job and that is the way I do it. And that is the best way I can explain it.'

    Former spy chief Sir John, who was head of MI6 from 2009 to 2014, yesterday hit back at claims that security services played a role in the radicalisation of British jihadist Mohammed Emwazi.

    Asim Qureshi, research director of Cage, claims Emwazi, who was nicknamed Jihadi John, was interrogated by MI5 and subjected to security agency harassment before becoming a militant.

    But Sir John said arguments that harassment drove Emwazi to join IS were 'very specious'.

    'The idea that somehow being spoken to by a member of MI5 is a radicalising act, I think this is very false and very transparent,' he told BBC Radio 4's Today programme.

    Sir John also told presenter Mishal Husain: 'Torture had been used for “thousands of years in order to extract useful information.

    'If you decide in 2015 that it doesn't work at all then that would be to misunderstand the problem.'

    He added: 'The whole problem about torture and maltreatment is sadly is that it does produce intelligence. And that’s why in a civilised society like ours we have to set aside certain methods, even though they might be effective in the short term. In the longer term they are very counterproductive; they are undermining the values of our society.'