Hp Seeks Renewal of Air Pollution Discharge Permit in Corvallis Or.

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Hp Seeks Renewal of Air Pollution Discharge Permit in Corvallis Or.

 news 2015-08-04 at 11:20:18 am Views: 281
  • #43214

    Hp Seeks Renewal of  Air Pollution Discharge Permit in Corvallis Oregon
    By  BENNETT HALL Corvallis Gazette-Times.

    Hewlett-Packard is asking for a renewal of the air pollution discharge permit for its Corvallis campus, and the public has a chance to weigh in on the decision.

    The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality is accepting written comments on the application until 5 p.m. Aug. 21 (see box for details).

    For the most part, the proposed permit is similar to the one the company is currently operating under, which was issued in 2009 and was set to expire on Nov. 1. HP submitted a renewal application well before the expiration date, so the old permit was extended while the new one is being considered.

    Under the proposed permit, HP’s Corvallis plant would be allowed to emit up to 24 tons a year of particulate matter, 14 tons of small particulates, 39 tons each of nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide and volatile organic compounds and 99 tons of carbon monoxide. All of those levels are the same as those allowed in the current permit.

    In addition, the new permit would cover the emission of two new classes of pollutants, allowing the plant to discharge up to 9 tons of fine particulates each year and 74,000 pounds of greenhouse gases.

    Those pollutants were not previously regulated by DEQ but are being incorporated into air pollution permits following recent rule changes.

    DEQ records show that a warning letter was issued to HP after the plant failed to meet some monitoring and record-keeping requirements for its acid scrubbers during a June 2012 inspection, but the problem was corrected to the agency’s satisfaction. There were no complaints during the prior permit period, and DEQ has taken no formal enforcement actions against the facility since the last permit renewal in 2009.

    Hewlett-Packard employs an estimated 1,800 people at its 140-acre Corvallis campus on Northeast Circle Boulevard (the company does not release local employee numbers). The site is used in the development of new printing and imaging technologies and in value-added processing of silicon wafers.

    The plant has 10 gas-fired boilers for heating water and nine wet scrubbers for treating acid exhausts from fabrication processes. It also has a number of other scrubbers and pollution control devices to remove ammonia, various gases and silicon dust generated on site.