INKJET CTGS CAN HELP YOUR LOCAL SHELTER

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INKJET CTGS CAN HELP YOUR LOCAL SHELTER

 user 2005-08-09 at 11:34:00 am Views: 60
  • #12094


    Old cell phones and ink cartridges can help your local shelter  

    Your used technology products can help DOGS & CATS . 
    SEEKONK – When
    Lesley Pierce called Epson printer company she was only looking for information
    about how to recycle her old ink cartridges, but ended up stumbling upon a new
    fundraising opportunity for the Seekonk Animal Shelter, where she works.
     
    An Epson representative referred Ms. Pierce, an animal control officer
    assistant in Seekonk since 1999, to FundingFactory for the information. The
    company recycles by collecting old cell phones and ink cartridges, but mainly
    relies on organizations looking to fundraise to send in the items. Groups are
    able to make money through the program because FundingFactory awards points for
    every item, which can be traded in for technology or cash.
     
    Ms. Pierce decided the program would be a good way for the shelter, which
    is constantly in need of funds, to raise money.
     
    “It’s another way for us to get funds for the shelter,” she said.
     
    “I mean it’s something they would probably throw in the trash.”
     
    Ms. Pierce said she is happy with the results of the new program, which
    started about three weeks ago. People can drop off old cell phones, laser and
    inkjet cartridges either at the shelter or at the clerk’s office at town hall.
    She added that animal control officers and volunteers are also willing to pick
    up donations at people’s homes until additional drop-off centers are established
    around town.
     
    Each cartridge and cell phone is assigned a specific point value. For
    instance, a Motorola A630 brings in 195 points, while a used cartridge made by
    Apple is worth 2.5 points. If the shelter decides to redeem its points for
    technology, it could purchase a digital camera for 1,140 points or a new
    computer keyboard for 37 points.
     
    It is free for the shelter to participate. After it registered, the shelter
    received free postage-paid boxes from the company.
     
    But it has yet to reap any of the benefits of the program, since they have
    not yet been able to collect enough phones and cartridges.
     
    Ms. Pierce said other animal shelters that participate in similar programs
    make an average of $200 a month.
     
    She said the shelter does not have a specific amount of money it hopes to
    make through the program, but thinks it will be a successful venture.
     
    “We’ll just take as much as we can get,” Ms. Pierce said.
     
    Currently 35,839 organizations throughout the United States and in Ontario
    are enrolled in FundingFactory’s program, according to its Web site. Since 1997,
    schools and nonprofit organizations have earned a total of $10 million, most of
    which was redeemed for technology and other supplies. Shelter manager Janet
    Bowden said the shelter is now raising funds for an addition, and hopes money
    raised through Fundingfactory can be added to the funds it already has.
     
    “What we really want to do is add cat space,” she said.
     
    “We process a couple hundred cats a year and really need a new cat room.”
     
    In addition to the recyclables, Ms. Bowden said the shelter is always in
    need of monetary gifts and pet food donations.
     
    “We are really in need of help,” she said.
     
    “This is a real busy time of the year and on top of that we’re short
    staffed.”