INK REFILLS JUST WON’T CUT IT..SAYS EPSON

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INK REFILLS JUST WON’T CUT IT..SAYS EPSON

 user 2005-10-10 at 10:47:00 am Views: 81
  • #13904

    Ink refill just won’t cut it, says Epson
    It’s true ink refills are cheaper but they’re inferior in quality as well.
    This was the short explanation offered by the local subsidiary of Epson
    Inc. as a response to observations that the “closed” proprietary
    cartridge model it has been espousing along with other printer makers
    is being challenged with the advent of various ink refilling stations
    in the metropolis.
    Epson Philippines, through assistant general manager for sales and
    marketing Jino Alvarez, said the higher price that consumers fork out
    for an original cartridge is reflected in the high quality of ink that
    it produces.
    He admitted that printer companies like Epson make their profits more
    on consumables such as inks rather than sales on printer units
    themselves, but he stressed the strict standards in their factories
    would assure consumers of clean and high quality products.
    This is something which refilling stations do not guaranty or provide,
    Alvarez said. “We cannot open up our cartridges to third parties
    because we have invested so much on our manufacturing process that we
    can’t allow anybody to tinker with the quality of our products.”
    The Epson executive also implied that opening up their cartridges to
    re-fillers would lessen the incentives for printer companies to keep on
    innovating and improving their ink technologies.
    Perhaps as a way of illustrating his point, Alvarez said the current
    four-color ink combination in its new line of printers is already
    capable of photo printing unlike before when it was just limited to
    document printing.
    “In the past, you need a six-color ink to produce a photo print-out.
    Now, you only need a six-color ink if you want your photo to have a
    higher quality than that of four-color ink,” said Alvarez, as he led
    the launching of new Epson products in Makati City last September 20.
    Among those which Epson unveiled for the first time for the Philippine
    market are film and photo scanners (Epson Perfection 3590 and 4490),
    portable photo printer (PictureMate 100), entry-level printers (Stylus
    C67, Stylus C87), and all-in-ones (Stylus CX3700, Stylus CX4100, Stylus
    CX4700).
    While acknowledging that single-function machines, such as printers,
    still dominate the local market, Alvarez said all-in-one machines that
    integrate printing, photo-copying, and scanning capabilities are now
    also gaining ground.
    The Epson official predicted that in two to three years, the market
    share of all-in-ones will improve from the current 30 percent to almost
    half of the local inkjet market.
    This, he said, is expected to replicate the trend in the United States
    where, according to an IDC survey, 77 percent of the inkjet market is
    made up of all-in-ones.