*NEWS* XEROX PHYSICIST HONORED

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*NEWS* XEROX PHYSICIST HONORED

 user 2005-12-20 at 10:11:00 am Views: 76
  • #13488

    Groundbreaking Xerox Physicist Honored
    Xerox Physicist Charles Duke Receives Honor for ‘Groundbreaking’ Research and Leadership.
    ROCHESTER, NY, Dec.  2005 – A Xerox Corporation  physicist, Dr. Charles B. Duke, has been awarded the American Physical Society’s 2006 George E. Pake Prize. Granted annually by the American Physical Society, the Pake Prize honors individuals for their work combining original research and the leadership of industrial research and development.
    Tunneling in Solids, Inelastic Scattering…
    The Society recently cited Duke for his “groundbreaking theoretical contributions to the understanding of tunneling in solids, and inelastic scattering of low-energy electrons in solids, and for his outstanding contributions to Xerox Corporate Research both as an intellectual and research manager.”
    Duke, vice president and senior research fellow in the Xerox Innovation Group, is a recognized expert in the nature of surfaces and interfaces between materials.
    “The George E. Pake Prize is a well-deserved honor for Charlie Duke. It is a true reflection of his impact on Xerox as a leader, mentor and innovator,” said Herv√© Gallaire, president, Xerox Innovation Group and chief technology officer.
    Impact on Xerox Developments
    At Xerox, Duke’s theoretical work influenced the design of a new class of polymer-based photoconductors and dry inks that led to the first Xerox products based on flexible-belt photoreceptors, a physical device inside a marking system on which an image is written and developed. This breakthrough has been at the core of Xerox products since the early 1980s.
    Beyond his corporate responsibilities, Duke has published more than 370 technical publications, including four books, and has supported and led several professional societies. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the IEEE, and the American Vacuum Society. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1993 and to the National Academy of Sciences in 2001.
    Duke served as founding editor in chief of the Journal of Materials Research, and from 1992 to 2001 he was editor in chief of Surface Science and Surface Science Letters. He currently is the chair of a National Research Council study of network science that advances knowledge of complex systems and processes exhibiting network behaviors.
    Duke joined Xerox in 1972. He received a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Duke University in 1959 and a doctorate in physics from Princeton University in 1963.
    The Pake Prize
    The George E. Pake Prize was endowed in 1983 by Xerox Corporation in recognition of the top achievements and contributions of Dr. George E. Pake, the founder and first director of the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center. The American Physical Society is an organization that advances and furthers the knowledge of physics worldwide. Duke will receive the Pake Prize in March at the American Physical Society’s meeting in Baltimore. Duke is the first Xerox researcher to win the Pake Prize for contributions primarily made as an active Xerox employee.