TUNA CONSERVATION TALKS IN JAPAN

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TUNA CONSERVATION TALKS IN JAPAN

 user 2007-01-22 at 12:43:00 pm Views: 56
  • #17235

    Tuna conservation talks in Japan
    A
    major effort to try to reverse the decline in tuna stocks worldwide is
    getting under way in Kobe, Japan.Five regional bodies responsible for
    managing stocks of tuna, one of the most valuable and endangered
    species, are at the meeting.They are to discuss plans to set up a
    global tracking system to certify the origin of every tuna that is
    sold.Conservationists blame illegal and unregulated fishing and
    unsustainable quotas for tuna’s dramatic decline.In the western
    Atlantic, the number of bluefin tuna capable of spawning is less than
    one-fifth of what it was 30 years ago, according to the body that
    monitors fish stocks there.

    Certificates of origin
    Last
    year, Japan admitted overfishing southern bluefin tuna and accepted a
    deep cut in its quota as punishment.It called the meeting of the
    different bodies that regulate tuna fishing across the globe to discuss
    measures to ensure the survival of the species.Delegates from
    governments and the fishing industry will discuss a proposal to force
    fishermen to produce certificates of origin for the tuna they
    catch.This would expand conservation programmes already in place in
    some parts of the world.It would go some way towards meeting the
    demands of conservation campaigners, like the WWF, who warn that tuna
    species face a high risk of what they call “commercial extinction” due
    to weak management of the industry.The capacity of the world’s tuna
    fleet is now far greater than that required to catch the legal quota,
    they say, and governments are not doing enough to implement
    conservation measures or to prosecute those fishermen who break the
    rules.