HP DOUBTS INK CARTRIDGE STANDARDISATION

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HP DOUBTS INK CARTRIDGE STANDARDISATION

 user 2007-07-13 at 10:54:00 am Views: 59
  • #18369

    HP doubts ink cartridge standardisation
    Standard test for cartridge longevity flawed, says cartridge manufacturer
    HP
    has questioned an international standard created to give consumers
    information on the amount of pages an inkjet cartridge can
    print.Compromises by manufacturers and time constrictions have meant
    important things have been overlooked in elements of the
    standardisation, HP has said.The International Organisation for
    Standardisation (ISO) standard for ink cartridges came into effect in
    December 2006. It was created by a consortium of printer manufactures
    including HP, Canon, Epson and Lexmark after the Office of Fair Trading
    critisied them for not informing consumers about the lasting power of
    inkjet cartridges.The standard is based on a test in which a black
    cartridge is run continuously alongside a colour one in a printer until
    the printer’s “out of ink message” appears for both. The test
    conditions include breaks for changing paper and temperature and
    humidity, which can often vary in a home environment.However, Whitney
    Loper, writing systems engineer at HP, said certain oversights and time
    constrictions have meant that the standard is not a true measurement of
    cost of ownership.“Whilst we welcome the standard as an overall way of
    regulating the industry and giving consumers information, there are
    some important aspects that we feel have been left out,” she said at
    the HP Lab event taking place in Portugal this week.“For starters the
    standard specifies that a printer manufacturer must run the test
    continuously until the ink runs out, however this is not indicative of
    a true consumer print which will often span across months of stopping
    and starting.“Time constraints have stopped this. It takes a week for a
    continuous print, so conducting the test to consumer conditions would
    take too long,” she addedPrinters often perform much better on a
    continuous print then they would by stopping and starting because ink
    gets stuck in nozzles and causes ink to fade.Loper outlined the
    problems that arise with such an oversight, by disclosing results of HP
    research that tested the print quality of stopping and starting over a
    week with a four hour stop and starting rate. It found that this method
    put a strain on the ink and fading occurred far more quickly than that
    in a continuous test.“This is something we have said all along but we
    have had to compromise with certain aspects of this standard because of
    the amount of manufacturers and industries taking part,” said Loper.She
    also claimed the testing did not take into account the differing
    absorbtion rates of other types of paper, as “consumers like to print
    photographs on glossy paper”.Although HP has said that the standard
    will probably not be approved until the end of 2008, it suggested that
    a working draft examining how different photo inks perform on the
    different media’s will be out within the next few months.