BUSH GIVES XEROX NAT’L MEDAL OF TECH….

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BUSH GIVES XEROX NAT’L MEDAL OF TECH….

 user 2007-07-18 at 2:09:00 pm Views: 87
  • #18406

    Xerox’s inventor-in-chief
    An
    innovation revival has lifted profits to $1.2 billion. Fortune’s Geoff
    Colvin asks CTO Sophie Vandebroek: Can the company keep it up?

    June
    2007– If all goes as scheduled, President Bush will hand Xerox’s
    Sophie Vandebroek the National Medal of Technology at the White House
    in late July. It will be a sweet moment for her and for a company that
    was built on a world-changing innovation – xerography – but that lost
    its way for a while in the Digital Revolution.The story of how Xerox’s
    Palo Alto Research Center in the 1970s failed to capitalize fully on
    two of the most critical elements of the personal computer – the
    graphical user interface and the mouse – has become legend. In 2000,
    then-CEO Paul Allaire admitted that the company’s business model didn’t
    work anymore – a conclusion Wall Street had already reached. A year
    later Xerox’s innovation ranking among its peers plunged to tenth
    (i.e., last) on Fortune’s annual list of America’s Most Admired
    Companies.Fortune’s Geoffrey Colvin talks with Xerox’s Chief Technology
    Officer, Sophie Vandebroek about the struggle to come up with new
    products and services.Recent years have been better. At a shade less
    than $16 billion, revenues have not changed much since 2003, but Xerox
    (Charts, Fortune 500) has increased profits every year, added $7
    billion in market cap, and more than tripled its profit margins.One key
    to the turnaround: Xerox has become an innovation power again,
    producing new technologies that can read, understand, route, and
    protect documents, among other things. Leading that effort is
    Vandebroek, 45, the company’s chief technology officer since late 2005.
    Her task is to keep Xerox at the leading edge of infotech progress in
    ways that make shareholders richer.Born and raised in Belgium,
    Vandebroek has a doctorate in electrical engineering from Cornell; she
    first joined Xerox in 1991. Before an invited audience in New York
    City, she talked with Fortune’s Geoff Colvin about the difference
    between invention and innovation; why Xerox employs anthropologists;
    how to make girls passionate about engineering; and much else.