ISLAND INKJET FOUNDER …….CARY PORCHER

  • banner-01-26-17b
  • Print
  • 4toner4
  • ncc-banner-902-x-177-june-2017
  • cartridgewebsite-com-big-banner-02-09-07-2016
  • 05 02 2016 429716a-cig-clearchoice-banner-902x177
  • mse-big-banner-new-03-17-2016-416716a-tonernews-web-banner-mse-212
  • 2toner1-2
  • clover-depot-intl-us-ca-email-signature-05-10-2017-902x1772
  • ces_web_banner_toner_news_902x1776
Share

ISLAND INKJET FOUNDER …….CARY PORCHER

 user 2008-01-21 at 12:12:00 pm Views: 79
  • #19232

    Island Inkjet founder part visionary, part flake
    Carey
    Porcher wonders about the difference between “being a flake and being a
    visionary.”And the CEO of Comox Valley–based Island Inkjet makes it
    clear he is wondering about himself.“It’s a fine line,” he says. “But
    the difference is that the visionary can formulate a plan and then
    deliver on it. Before that happens, flakes and visionaries look
    alike.”Porcher, who was formally schooled in Victoria and informally
    educated in 40 countries he visited after he left here, has delivered
    on so many plans now, the clothing factory in Katmandu and the
    restaurant in Germany, for example, or the orphanage in the
    Philippines, that he could be forgiven for wanting to retire from
    Island Inkjet with its international chain of 260 franchises, and
    perhaps start up a sustainable community in the Shuswap.In fact, he
    tried that in 2005. But his managers lacked his vision and 100
    franchises failed to get going.He came back to rescue the operation and
    now is poised to unleash a new franchising drive.If there seems to be a
    frenetic pace to Porcher’s life, he’s the first to admit it, only
    half-jokingly terming himself “ADD” (for Attention Deficit Disorder)
    several times in a short interview. “I’m very restless. I get bored
    very quickly.”Jamming a lot of experience into a short time is nothing
    new. Right from Camosun College he started on his world tour, paying
    his way through two score countries by doing sleight-of-hand, or what
    he calls, “close-up illusions” in nightclubs.In Germany a decade ago he
    opened a 200-seat restaurant with a Canadian outdoors theme, which he
    left to his wife’s family to manage. This year the operation’s lease
    expires and it will presumably close.In India he partnered with friends
    to start a clothing factory and in Nepal, a resort.Back in Canada, his
    personal and business life intersected to land him in Courtenay.With
    his parents in Victoria and a new girlfriend in Campbell River, he
    hunkered down at the pleasantest point in between. That relationship
    didn’t prosper but a new one did (and does).When the Indian venture
    went sour — an order of 300 Goretex jackets delivered with the pockets
    sewn shut — he decided he had to find a business he could run hands on
    — in Courtenay.His new wife, a banker, told him about a local technical
    guy who refilled printer cartridges at her office and who could use
    some business savvy.“He is a genius but not a businessman. He was
    making just $1,500 a month. He quickly asked me to become partners,”
    recalls Porcher.“I told him if I can get sales to $15,000 a month I’ll
    think about it.” That took longer than he expected — three months — and
    Island Inkjet, the franchisor, was born.What Porcher realized was the
    enormous potential offered by the “greed” of the printer manufacturers.
    “They were raping the public and the public was angry,” he says.Printer
    makers were selling printers at giveaway prices and then charging
    excessive prices for replacement ink cartridges that were far from
    filled with ink.Porcher quickly established franchise operations in
    Victoria and Nanaimo, then took the model on the road, planting
    operations, in the early years of the decade, in malls across
    Canada.With supplies secured from Island Inkjet, the franchisees refill
    cartridges on site. To date, the firm has refilled 120 million
    cartridges worldwide.Porcher left the firm to managers in 2005,
    expecting to move to the Shuswap and start a sustainable community with
    his growing, blended family of five children and like-minded adults.But
    his successors lost sight, he says, of the company’s basic dependence
    on growing new franchises.In 2006, he returned, contemplated selling
    the company to its Australian competitor, and then elected to get more
    deeply involved.He’s also writing a pair of business books; supporting
    several children in a Philippines orphanage with the intention of
    funding even more; and still scheming to establish a green community in
    the Shuswap.