BEST-BUY NOW ACCEPTS E-WASTE IN 9 MARKETS AND 117 STORES

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BEST-BUY NOW ACCEPTS E-WASTE IN 9 MARKETS AND 117 STORES

 user 2008-06-04 at 12:42:44 pm Views: 64
  • #20256
    http://blogs.pcworld.com/staffblog/archives/007051.html
    Best Buy Now Accepts E-Waste in Nine Markets and 117 Stores
    Getting
    rid of your old PC, TV and that hulking CRT monitor can be a digital
    pain in the you know what. Best Buy wants to help. The consumer
    electronics giant announced a pilot program that allows anyone to drop
    off computers, cameras, cell phones, TVs and computer monitors (up to
    32 inches) at Best Buy stores. Best Buy is first rolling out the
    program in Minnesota, Iowa, North and South Dakota, Wisconsin,
    Washington, DC, Maryland, Virginia and Northern California. You are
    limited to two items a day.The new program will not include console
    TVs, air conditioners, microwaves or kitchen appliances. However the
    company does point out it has several ‘haul away’ programs to deal with
    larger appliances.If successful, the company says it plans to roll out
    the recycling program across all 922 U.S. stores, according to reports.

    E-Waste Overload
    The
    new program came about after As You Sow, an advocacy group for
    corporate accountability, pushed Best Buy’s shareholders to endorse
    increased recycling efforts by the retail giant.Best Buy has offered
    recycling bins for small items such as cell phone batteries and ink
    cartridges since 2004, and, like many other retailers, has had in-store
    recycling events since 2001. The new pilot program is assumed to be the
    largest recycling effort for electronics by a major U.S. retailer. You
    can find a complete list of areas where the new recycling program is
    running here.As February 17, 2009, when all TV signals will go digital
    and analog TVs become obsolete, many consumers are expected to opt for
    a new television instead of converting their existing sets. No doubt
    Best Buy hopes to capitalize on the expected TV sales boom by bringing
    customers into the store with the new recycling program.Recycling
    electronics has become a major concern for manufacturers and retailers
    because many devices contain harmful toxins and heavy metals such as
    lead, mercury and zinc. According to the latest statistics from the
    Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. dumped 2 million tons of
    electronics into landfills in 2005 and electronic waste is the fastest
    growing form of waste in the country.