HP's NEW 2-STEP PROCESS FOR REMOVING INK

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HP's NEW 2-STEP PROCESS FOR REMOVING INK

 user 2009-10-13 at 11:33:09 am Views: 63
  • #22426

    http://www.greentechmedia.com/green-light/post/hewlett-packards-got-some-chemicals-for-removing-ink/
    HP’s NEW 2-STEP PROCESS FOR REMOVING INK
    Hewlett-Packard
    says the answer to getting rid of ink on recycled paper revolves around
    bubbles.HP Labs says it has devised a two-step process for removing ink
    from paper, which in turn will aid the recycling process. First,
    ethoxylated fatty alcohol is added to the vat of pulped paper to
    separate ink particles from the paper fibers. Then, anionic surfactants
    (check the medicine cabinet; you probably have some chewables made of
    this) are added to collect the ink droplets into bubbles that can be
    skimmed off the surface.”It gives us a universal deinking chemistry
    that caters to digital commercial prints and inkjet dye-based ink.”
    said HP Labs researcher Hou Ng in a prepared statement. “Our most
    recent data shows that we were able to use this deinking chemistry for
    offset media, like newsprint, which is one of the hardest media to
    deink.”

    A few years ago, HP showed off technology from making
    plastic ink cartridges out of old G.I. Joes and other discarded
    items.HP, of course, likes this technology because it can sell more
    printers, but the real game is royalties. Like IBM and Microsoft, HP
    garners millions a years from intellectual property licensing. The
    effort started back in 2003 when HP formed an internal group dedicated
    toward identifying interesting technologies in its labs and then
    finding customers for them. HP has great science and scientists, but
    sometimes has difficulty product-izing it all. Hence, they royalty
    strategy.Patent licensing is often attacked by critics as unfair and
    crippling to innovation. Then again, most of them haven’t invented
    anything you’d want to steal.