SECRETS OF HIGH-QUALITY RECYCLED INKJETS

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SECRETS OF HIGH-QUALITY RECYCLED INKJETS

 user 2004-03-18 at 9:21:00 am Views: 69
  • #6628
    Improving Inkjet Quality: Secrets of High-Quality Recyclers
     
    When I consult with companies that are having troubles with inkjets, I notice that they share a common problem. They often do not know what a virgin cartridge is, nor do they know what the typical quality of the collected virgin lot should be. You can’t blame them.

    For several reasons, the quality of the true virgin gets lost. One reason is nozzle filling. With nozzle filling there is no way to tell whether an HP 51645 cartridge is virgin or not without analyzing the residual ink. In the case of the HP 6578, vent plugs can be pushed so deep into the foam that they don’t rattle when the cartridge is shaken. Then the plugs are replaced with a flawless replica plug. Some remanufacturers even pry out the plug and reuse it. Others probe the nozzle plate and resell the rejects. Other black cartridges such as the 51629 can be filled through the maze hole and, when rejected, can be emptied so it resembles a virgin. Not everyone who uses these remanufacturing techniques counterfeits a virgin, but it happens often enough to skew the recyclable percentage of the typical brokered lot negatively, leaving the remanufacturer in less than total control.

    Instead of attacking the problem head on, remanufacturers often react to yield problems by implementing unnecessary machines and processes. Lot after lot of true virgin cartr…